RobinOne wants you to skip the oil change

If you’re still using a car with an internal combustion engine, you’ve probably either got a sticker on your windshield or some sort of digital reminder telling you when you need your next oil change. It always comes too quickly, too, and costs more than you would want. The German makers of RobinOne want you to stop changing your oil so often, and think you should just clean your oil at home instead.

RobinOne is essentially dialysis for your car. It’s is a filtration device that removes suspended particles, dust, and water that contaminate your oil over time, and puts the clean oil right back into your vehicle. RobinOne is a small, portable box with a pump and special filter inside. You connect it to your car’s battery for power, put one tube in the dispenser where your dipstick lives, put the other tube in the oil filler, and turn the machine on. It cycles your motor oil, removing all the stuff that you’d usually get rid of by changing your oil.

The folks behind RobinOne say that, depending on your driving habits, it can extend the life of your oil to up to 124,000 miles. You’ll have to purify your oil every 6,200 miles for city/short-distance driving, or every 12,400 highway miles. They still recommend you change your oil filter every 37,000 miles, and that you replace RobinOne’s filter after every 20 purifications. It’s supposed to work with various types of oil in various engines, just don’t use the same filter for different types.

If you’re worried about things like detergents and other important additives breaking down, RobinOne doesn’t mention anything about that, which gives us pause about extending oil’s lifespan too far. The folks at RobinOne do suggest you use an oil test like MotorCheckUp, and change your oil if it doesn’t pass muster after purification.

RobinOne is currently available for preorder through its IndieGogo crowdfunding campaign at a price of $150 (with an expected retail price of $299). If you’re wondering what filters will cost, they’re expected to fetch another $40 apiece. If it works as well as the makers say it does, it could help save money (assuming using recycled oil proves safe for one’s engine), and it would definitely save oil.

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