We Hunted Some Monsters In Monster Hunter Generations Ultimate On The Switch

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Monster Hunter Generations Ultimate is a game lost in time, which is not a description that would have been apt six months ago. The Switch game is a port of a 3DS title released in Japan in March 2017, which is itself an enhanced version of a game released in 2015. The legacy of the title leaves it feeling moderately awkward in a post-Monster Hunter World environment, though its overflowing content does a lot to make up for quality of life improvements.

Unlike its humble 3DS beginnings, Monster Hunter Generations Ultimate is in HD, both docked and undocked. The game looks crisp compared to the 3DS versions and predecessor Monster Hunter 4, as the bump in resolution and smoothing out of jagged edges does provide an appreciable visual clarity bump. Unfortunately, not every part of the game was redone for the new resolution, as multiple UI elements look blown and scaled up for HD in an unpleasant way.

The demo we played put us against Generations Ultimate’s new banner elder dragon, Valstrax. The scaly creature rushes into hunters with the speed of a Tigrex and refuses to stay still for even a second. Despite a valiant effort, the hunting party failed to beat Valstrax, as he shot forward like a missile into three hunters at once and caused an instant loss.

Bringing Monster Hunter off the 3DS is an undeniable leap for controls. A Pro controller works to lessen the issues with playing such a demanding action game in a cramped space and even the Switch’s built-in joycons make the game feel more comfortable. The action is aided by a rock-solid framerate at 60 FPS, which never waivers, one of the benefits of porting a 3DS game to the much more powerful Switch.

People who have Monster Hunter Generations on 3DS will be able to transfer their save files, including their hunter and all their weapons, equipment, and items, to Generations Ultimate on the Switch. Capcom says this will be done via an app downloadable from the 3DS eShop that will facilitate moving the save file over to the Switch.

We asked whether Monster Hunter Generations Ultimate would be using Nintendo’s online app for voice chat and were told that the game doesn’t support voice chat online.

Monster Hunter Generations Ultimate is that same Monster Hunter fans loved before Monster Hunter World came out and can probably love again, but those small improvements and changes add up. That said, the content in the game is incredible, and our first impressions are that it is the ultimate culmination of what defined the pre-World Monster Hunter games.

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